Speech Recognition – Throw Away Everything You Thought You Knew – from AHDI ACE 2011

Hello everyone: I apologize for taking so long to get these slides uploaded! I’ve been crazy busy traveling, and then playing catch up after traveling. I’m looking forward to writing more about ACE 2011 (very exciting this year!) as soon as I get a few moments, but I wanted to get these out to you now.

AHDI_ACE_20110821

And for anyone who wants more information about some of the things mentioned in my slides, here are some links to previous articles:

Speech Recognition – general

Is Speech Recognition the answer to all your problems?

Speech Rec is here to stay…

MT Compensation and Management

MT Compensation

The Demise of the Career MT

What Factors Contribute to MT Career-Mindedness?

Optimization of speech recognition Technology Results

When Metrics Mean Nothing – The Myth of the “Percent Gain”

What does the Medical Transcription Industry Sell?

Narrative Documentation, Standards

Are we Telling the Real Health Story?

A Vision for Truly Meaningful Health Information

The Documentation and Coding Adjustment (DCA): A CDI Specialist’s Perspective

This week on Excellence in Health Information, I am pleased to present Donna Wright, MSN, RN, CCDS, currently a medical coding data analyst at M*Modal, formerly a Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialist for a health system here in Pittsburgh. Donna has a 28-year-long nursing career and has worked in a variety of fields including critical care, OR, clinical research, and supervisory/management in long term care. She is a graduate of Lehigh University, St. Luke’s School of Nursing, with a BSN from Slippery Rock University and MSN in Informatics from Walden University.  Donna is married to a structural engineer and has two grown children.

Donna brings up some interesting points in her post about clinical documentation improvement and the stance CMS has taken with respect to changes in reimbursement levels resulting from documentation improvement.  I visited a provider two weeks ago who told me, “we are only asking to be paid for what we are actually doing – no more and no less.” What does everyone think? Do you have a story to tell about CDI in your organization?

See what Donna has to say here

Health Information – the Exciting Road Ahead!

Dr. Schreiber of San Augustine giving a typhoi...

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Hello everyone:

I have been privileged over the past couple of weeks to visit some of the most prestigious health care providers in the country and to hear their thoughts about the state of health information today.  I can tell you that we in the health information field are in for some exciting times ahead!  Whether we work for HIT or HIM companies or for health care providers, the changes occurring in health care mean that our roles in serving health care are changing too.  So there could be no better time to pick up our conversations again on Excellence in Health Information.

See the rest here…Health Information – the Exciting Road Ahead!

Til next time!
Lynn
M*Modal

Change Ahead for M*Modal and MedQuist

Today’s world is full of change.  In the world of health care, with new discoveries, new treatments, and new technologies found seemingly every day, change may be the only constant.

And so it is with businesses that support health care, where change can lead to the need for migration to new service and product offerings and to corresponding changes in business models.  Consolidations of businesses in the health information service and technology domains often occur as companies seek to increase revenues, take advantage of synergies, or as in the case I’m going to talk about here, to merge two companies with different but complementary talents as part of a growth strategy.

Most of you have probably heard that my employer M*Modal is about to be affected by such a change.  On Monday, July 11,  a merger between M*Modal, a leader in speech recognition and natural language understanding technologies, and MedQuist, a leading provider of medical transcription services and documentation workflow technology, was announced.  It was also announced that Vern Davenport, former CEO of Misys Healthcare and long-time HIT industry leader, will become the CEO of the combined company.

This announcement came as a surprise to many who know us as the small but quickly growing company whose senior executives are the very guys you came to know as industry innovators.  It may not have been a surprise to some, however, who in view of market activity in recent years wondered at M*Modal’s ability to compete against significantly larger companies.

And though we at M*Modal have rather enjoyed being David in a David-and-Goliath-like competitive environment, our leaders understood that now is the time when acceleration of our efforts is needed for our customers.

MedQuist too has been observing changes in the industry and sees value in combining their world-class services with the industry-leading technology that will allow them to offer their customers the best of both worlds – innovative technology offered by people who understand the world in which it will be implemented and used.

What does this mean to M*Modal customers and to its partner relationships?  It means only good things.  To the partners who rely on M*Modal technology to provide services to their customers, it means robust strength.  To the partners who incorporate M*Modal solutions into their technology offerings, it means partnership with a company with greater market presence.  To our health care provider customers, it means greater flexibility and options.  And since M*Modal understands that our customers need us to act fast in response to health care’s changing needs, then perhaps most importantly, this merger means that M*Modal will have the ability to bring solutions to health care faster.

Many of you have been kind enough to ask what this means to me personally.  To be honest, I was surprised at the announcement, and was admittedly concerned.  I mean, anyone who knows me knows that I believe in M*Modal and its vision with my whole heart.  But… after a visit from our future leader, Vern Davenport, my concerns have changed to excitement, hope, and even eagerness.

In speaking with the M*Modal team, he made it clear that this is not a case of one company absorbing another.  To the contrary, he explained that we are two companies joining forces to support health care providers as they continue to adopt electronic health records and as they embark on the transformation to value-based care.   He told us that his role as the CEO of the newly formed company will not be a job for him – it will be a mission.  He said he is here for one reason – to make an impact on health care. Well, for me that was the statement that clinched it.  I’m in.

In short, this new relationship will ensure that M*Modal can continue on its path towards creating a collaborative ecosystem for health information that supports the health care provider and which contributes to health care itself.  We have always strived to serve those who serve the patient – and now we’ll have the ability to do so with even greater impact.

For the immediate future, the two companies will continue to operate separately as all the i’s are dotted and t’s are crossed.  But stay tuned for more!  I’ll be sure to keep you updated…

In the meantime, like me, rest assured that we are not the Starship Enterprise and the Borg (you know, “you will be assimilated. Resistance is futile.”)  Like Jean Luc Picard, current M*Modal CEO Michael Finke and the other M*Modal leaders will continue to lead us as we “boldly go where no one has gone before” into the exciting times ahead.  (CBS Entertainment, 2010)

For more details, here is a link to the formal announcement  http://www.medquist.com/Home/tabid/36/Default.aspx

All my best as always,

Lynn

Still M*Modal

Disclaimer:  All nerdy Star Trek references are mine – not to be blamed on anyone else at MedQuist or M*Modal.

CBS Entertainment. (2010).  Star TrekTM. Retrieved July 14, 2011 from http://www.startrek.com/.

Response to Questions…

Hello everyone:  Over the past couple of months I’ve been privileged to present at several conferences and to do a couple of webinars. Since then some questions about these presentations have been sent my way (thank you!).

I thought it might be helpful to provide some links to some past articles that might be of interest to anyone who has questions about some of the presentations.

Thanks so much for proving once again how dedicated the people in the health information industry are to providing and producing high-value health information!

As always, questions and comments are most welcome!

Lynn,

M*Modal

Speech Recognition – general

Is Speech Recognition the answer to all your problems?

Speech Rec is here to stay…

MT Compensation and Management

MT Compensation

The Demise of the Career MT

ACE 2010 Presentation – Keeping Transcription Relevant into the Future

What Factors Contribute to MT Career-Mindedness?

Slides from NEMA AHDI Presentation…

Optimization of speech recognition Technology Results

When Metrics Mean Nothing – The Myth of the “Percent Gain”

What does the Medical Transcription Industry Sell?

Narrative Documentation, Standards

Are we Telling the Real Health Story?

A Vision for Truly Meaningful Health Information

Speech Recognition as the Accelerator of Meaningful Clinical Documentation

Hello everyone: Over the last couple of weeks I had the opportunity to attend several conferences. One was the national conference of the Case Management Society of America (CMSA) (more about this visit later) which was held in San Antonio, Texas, (home of the Alamo). Then I had the privilege of presenting to two state HIMA conferences; New Jersey (NJHIMA) in Atlantic City, and then back to Texas (TxHIMA) for their state conference in Dallas.

As always, I really enjoyed meeting with state HIMA members. It is so satisfying to know that wherever you are in the country, HIM professionals have the same passion for safe, high-quality, useful health information. It is also interesting to see that everyone seems to be facing the same challenges with respect to adoption and use of electronic health records. Everywhere I go, I hear the same stories about point-and-click, template-driven EHR systems that are time-intensive and cumbersome for the physician, that don’t provide the necessary information for the HIM, and which cause concerns for the health care enterprise because of costs and questionable ROI.

Needless to say, there is always interest in discussing narrative documentation including how to produce it cost-effectively and efficiently, and how it can be used to generate the discrete data needed for the interoperable exchange of information, to provide data for reporting and analysis, to drive clinical decision support and other automated care protocols, and in general, to realize the benefits that we all expect as we make use of electronic health information.

Some of you have seen these before, but just in case, here are my slides:  NarrativeDocumentation_HIMA_20110629.

In a nutshell:

1. Today’s changing health care environment is setting higher standards for documentation while seemingly making it more difficult for physicians to document patient care. The need for documentation to support Meaningful Use, to drive the communications and reporting necessary for Accountable Care and the Patient-Centered Medical home, to enable the conversion to ICD-10 from ICD-9, and to support the reporting required to monitor quality and outcomes is increasing. It is more apparent than ever that comprehensive, complete, and accurate health information is integral to the functioning of any health care facility. And yet newer methods of documenting patient care are often inefficient and time consuming for the physician and are not intuitive for other consumers of health information.
2. Dictation is still a viable, economical, and effective means of capturing clinical information.
3. In order to be cost- and time-effective, options for clinical documentation must be made available based on the type of encounter being documented and the needs of the user. For some encounters, templated, structured forms are likely sufficient. For others, physicians may do very well with speech recognition and self-editing. For more complex encounters, physician dictation supported by skilled medical transcription might still be the best way to go. The point is – health care providers must have flexibility and options for capturing the complete, comprehensive level of information required to support patient care, coding for billing and reimbursement, research and population health reporting, and all of the other uses for health information.
4. Speech recognition and other technologies, when combined with efficient management practices, can be a cost-effective way to produce high-quality narrative documentation.
5. We cannot continue to look to the best practices that many services and providers have historically followed when implementing speech recognition. In the past the goal might have been to “create cheap documentation fast” – now the goal for clinical documentation MUST be, “create useful documentation efficiently.’
6. Quality is key. We are all hearing a great deal about natural language processing, computer assisted coding, and other technologies that will help us to process and make use of our health information – but if the documentation at the foundation of these technologies is poor – the technology can’t do its job.
7. Efficient management practices are another key component. The percentage of productivity gained does not necessarily reflect the increase in output! Again, technology is no replacement for effective management practices.
8. It is not, as many believe, necessary to eliminate narrative documentation in order to have semantically interoperable electronic information. The Health Story, HL7, IHE Consolidation project is making great strides towards the creation of interoperable standards for the exchange and use of health information which will allow us to have the structured and encoded clinical data that we need to support automated processes, while at the same time retaining the human-readable narrative information that is required for communication and understanding. I personally have always been a big believer in having my cake… and eating it too. 

If you have any questions about the slides or the presentation please let me know. I’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences!

Till next time,
Lynn
M*Modal

Physician Heal Thyself – A Letter to My Doctors

Muhammad ibn Zakariya ar-Razi

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Hi all:  Do you remember a while back when I blogged about a visit to my doctor where she was so busy inputting information into her EMR – that she forgot to examine me?  I sat on the exam table while she sat with her back to me interviewing me according to the EMR template.

I experienced another interesting doctor’s visit just last week.  Read my Letter to My Doctors on Excellence in Health Information.

All my best as always,

Lynn

M*Modal

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