Speech Recognition – Throw Away Everything You Thought You Knew – from AHDI ACE 2011

Hello everyone: I apologize for taking so long to get these slides uploaded! I’ve been crazy busy traveling, and then playing catch up after traveling. I’m looking forward to writing more about ACE 2011 (very exciting this year!) as soon as I get a few moments, but I wanted to get these out to you now.

AHDI_ACE_20110821

And for anyone who wants more information about some of the things mentioned in my slides, here are some links to previous articles:

Speech Recognition – general

Is Speech Recognition the answer to all your problems?

Speech Rec is here to stay…

MT Compensation and Management

MT Compensation

The Demise of the Career MT

What Factors Contribute to MT Career-Mindedness?

Optimization of speech recognition Technology Results

When Metrics Mean Nothing – The Myth of the “Percent Gain”

What does the Medical Transcription Industry Sell?

Narrative Documentation, Standards

Are we Telling the Real Health Story?

A Vision for Truly Meaningful Health Information

Response to Questions…

Hello everyone:  Over the past couple of months I’ve been privileged to present at several conferences and to do a couple of webinars. Since then some questions about these presentations have been sent my way (thank you!).

I thought it might be helpful to provide some links to some past articles that might be of interest to anyone who has questions about some of the presentations.

Thanks so much for proving once again how dedicated the people in the health information industry are to providing and producing high-value health information!

As always, questions and comments are most welcome!

Lynn,

M*Modal

Speech Recognition – general

Is Speech Recognition the answer to all your problems?

Speech Rec is here to stay…

MT Compensation and Management

MT Compensation

The Demise of the Career MT

ACE 2010 Presentation – Keeping Transcription Relevant into the Future

What Factors Contribute to MT Career-Mindedness?

Slides from NEMA AHDI Presentation…

Optimization of speech recognition Technology Results

When Metrics Mean Nothing – The Myth of the “Percent Gain”

What does the Medical Transcription Industry Sell?

Narrative Documentation, Standards

Are we Telling the Real Health Story?

A Vision for Truly Meaningful Health Information

Speech Recognition as the Accelerator of Meaningful Clinical Documentation

Hello everyone: Over the last couple of weeks I had the opportunity to attend several conferences. One was the national conference of the Case Management Society of America (CMSA) (more about this visit later) which was held in San Antonio, Texas, (home of the Alamo). Then I had the privilege of presenting to two state HIMA conferences; New Jersey (NJHIMA) in Atlantic City, and then back to Texas (TxHIMA) for their state conference in Dallas.

As always, I really enjoyed meeting with state HIMA members. It is so satisfying to know that wherever you are in the country, HIM professionals have the same passion for safe, high-quality, useful health information. It is also interesting to see that everyone seems to be facing the same challenges with respect to adoption and use of electronic health records. Everywhere I go, I hear the same stories about point-and-click, template-driven EHR systems that are time-intensive and cumbersome for the physician, that don’t provide the necessary information for the HIM, and which cause concerns for the health care enterprise because of costs and questionable ROI.

Needless to say, there is always interest in discussing narrative documentation including how to produce it cost-effectively and efficiently, and how it can be used to generate the discrete data needed for the interoperable exchange of information, to provide data for reporting and analysis, to drive clinical decision support and other automated care protocols, and in general, to realize the benefits that we all expect as we make use of electronic health information.

Some of you have seen these before, but just in case, here are my slides:  NarrativeDocumentation_HIMA_20110629.

In a nutshell:

1. Today’s changing health care environment is setting higher standards for documentation while seemingly making it more difficult for physicians to document patient care. The need for documentation to support Meaningful Use, to drive the communications and reporting necessary for Accountable Care and the Patient-Centered Medical home, to enable the conversion to ICD-10 from ICD-9, and to support the reporting required to monitor quality and outcomes is increasing. It is more apparent than ever that comprehensive, complete, and accurate health information is integral to the functioning of any health care facility. And yet newer methods of documenting patient care are often inefficient and time consuming for the physician and are not intuitive for other consumers of health information.
2. Dictation is still a viable, economical, and effective means of capturing clinical information.
3. In order to be cost- and time-effective, options for clinical documentation must be made available based on the type of encounter being documented and the needs of the user. For some encounters, templated, structured forms are likely sufficient. For others, physicians may do very well with speech recognition and self-editing. For more complex encounters, physician dictation supported by skilled medical transcription might still be the best way to go. The point is – health care providers must have flexibility and options for capturing the complete, comprehensive level of information required to support patient care, coding for billing and reimbursement, research and population health reporting, and all of the other uses for health information.
4. Speech recognition and other technologies, when combined with efficient management practices, can be a cost-effective way to produce high-quality narrative documentation.
5. We cannot continue to look to the best practices that many services and providers have historically followed when implementing speech recognition. In the past the goal might have been to “create cheap documentation fast” – now the goal for clinical documentation MUST be, “create useful documentation efficiently.’
6. Quality is key. We are all hearing a great deal about natural language processing, computer assisted coding, and other technologies that will help us to process and make use of our health information – but if the documentation at the foundation of these technologies is poor – the technology can’t do its job.
7. Efficient management practices are another key component. The percentage of productivity gained does not necessarily reflect the increase in output! Again, technology is no replacement for effective management practices.
8. It is not, as many believe, necessary to eliminate narrative documentation in order to have semantically interoperable electronic information. The Health Story, HL7, IHE Consolidation project is making great strides towards the creation of interoperable standards for the exchange and use of health information which will allow us to have the structured and encoded clinical data that we need to support automated processes, while at the same time retaining the human-readable narrative information that is required for communication and understanding. I personally have always been a big believer in having my cake… and eating it too. 

If you have any questions about the slides or the presentation please let me know. I’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences!

Till next time,
Lynn
M*Modal

Jay Vance – Guest Blog on Excellence in Health Information

Little airplane

Image via Wikipedia

Hello all:  It is my great pleasure to host Jay Vance as a guest blogger on Excellence in Health Information.

Jay’s presents his insight on the challenges facing medical transcription and healthcare in general, and how we can face these challenges.

Please join me in welcoming Jay and we invite you to participate in the discussion.

All the best,

Lynn

M*Modal

Excellence In Health Information – Live!

Hello everyone: It’s live! Our new blog Excellence in Health Information is now live on Advance HIM Insider: Blogs!

Again, the purpose of the new blog is not to exclude transcription or to direct the conversation away from transcription – but is rather to create an exchange for information about truly useful health information from a holistic point of view – not limited to any specific group. After all, transcribed documentation is an integral piece of the HIM domain – a fact that I believe is too often forgotten, both by the healthcare provider, and sadly, by the medical transcription industry itself.

Of course, we will still be here at Management for the Modern MTSO , but by posting on a site as respected as the one provided by Advance, we hope to bring the discussion to an even larger and more diverse audience.

Please join us there for ongoing discussions about health information and it’s evolution from the world of “documents” to the foundation upon which collaborative care of the patient can occur that health information can and should be.

We hope to see you there!

-Lynn

Transcription world-wide

Hello all: I’ve spent the last couple of days talking to our transcription counterparts in London. Just a few items I thought might be of interest…

1. They don’t have a dedicated MT position – transcription is done by medical secretaries. The secretaries do transcription and perform many other functions including helping patients to navigate the NHS (National Health System) for the public hospitals, and performing scheduling and other support for physicians in the private hospitals.
2. They don’t do nearly the amount of documentation through dictation and transcription that we do. Some assume it is because the push for the EMR has been more successful in Europe than in the U.S. In actuality, in the U.K. they complete much of their documentation on paper forms including discharge summaries and operative notes. They would very much love to allow the doctors to dictate these types of documents if they could do so in such a way as to get the dictation into the EMR. Sound familiar?
3. They do a lot of letters and correspondence since patients are often referred to specialists through the NHS. Each patient has a GP (counterpart of a PCP in the U.S.) who refers patients to specialists when needed. Letters and correspondence are used by these physicians to keep each other informed.
4. Doctors like having the medical secretaries and the outsourcing of transcription is not a popular topic.
5. They don’t have a widely accepted and well-organized group like AHDI to represent them – but there are two groups AMSPAR and BSMSA which aim to serve the needs of medical secretaries, to define qualifications, and to support the profession. Take a look! They aren’t as widely known or accepted as AHDI – perhaps we should reach out across the pond and meet them!

-Lynn

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