Throw Away Everything you Thought you Knew About Speech Recognition and Medical Transcription

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Image via Wikipedia

Hello everyone:  What better way to roll into National Medical Transcriptionist Week than with a trip to lovely Fort Lauderdale to meet with the even lovelier folks of AHDI – Florida!

As always, a visit to this lively, engaged group of dedicated professionals resulted in more discussion than there was time!  And to cap it all off, I had the pleasure of meeting two luminaries in the health information domain, Pat Forbis and Claudia Tessier.  I was greatly humbled to have been part of a speaking schedule that included two women who have been such leaders in our field. I even got to share a bench with Claudia, both of us “iPadding” away.  Very cool to “ipad” sitting next to the leader of the mHealth Initiative!

The theme for AHDI-Florida’s annual meeting was the “Winds of Change”, so what better topics to discuss than the emerging technologies which are having such an impact on our industry, on health information, and on how health care itself is delivered.

The point I most wanted to make in my presentation is that changing technologies do not mean the end of medical transcription.  In fact, if we keep sight of the fact that medical transcription is about the accurate and high-quality creation of meaningful, useful clinical documentation – not the “cheap” creation of something someone only uses to check off requirements on a chart completion list, then transcription can actually be an important enabler for electronic health information.

Unfortunately, the focus in recent years has sometimes been on the wrong things.  We’ve focused so much on cost, on print formats, and on providing customized requirements, that we’ve lost sight of the real value we provide to the health care provider.  Worse, we’ve allowed them to lose sight of our value too.

So let’s throw away everything we thought we knew about transcription, slides here –  Florida_AHDI_20110514 , and look at it in an entirely new light.  Let’s look at it as a way to provide high-quality, comprehensive documentation to support increasing demands for information….produced in a way that happens to be cost-effective.

What can we do?

  1. Make sure everyone knows about the Health Story project, particularly the Health Story, IHE, HL7 Consolidation project.  Learn about it, and share your knowledge with your employer, your customers, your vendors, and your representatives in the U.S. Congress.
  2. Remember how important your highly skilled, highly productive, career-MTs are if you are to be a provider of information that can be used to support Meaningful Use, computer assisted coding, the coming ICD-10 conversion, and the other increased demands for health information that are coming our way.  Feel free to refer here for links to other articles about this topic.
  3. Focus on quality.  Without quality, the rest can’t happen.

Thank you as always to AHDI-Florida for being such gracious hosts and such passionate supporters of high-quality clinical documentation.

And don’t forget to visit Misty and Bethany at M*Modal’s Always Understanding blog for activities all week in honor of National Medical Transcriptionist Week!

All my best as always,

Lynn

M*Modal

2 Responses

  1. Lynn – you are right – great conference – my first time to AHDI-FL, and now I understand why the Floridians have such a great reputation for their tremendous events. If all goes well for me, it will not be my last.

    As usual, your presentation was terrific. I am so glad you stress quality to the extent that you do. That is really the differentiator between strictly automated text and that reviewed and finalized by an experienced medical language expert, a.k.a. transcriptionist. As a software developer, I am all about automation, and making technology work for us, but many years in this business has also taught me how imperative a good quality process, a discerning set of eyes and ears, and most of all, experienced wisdom and judgment, are to any automated process – especially when human lives are at stake – great job.

    • Thank you as always!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: